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Jonathan Kizer

Jonathan Kizer is a freelance writer that has been featured across the web. His experience is wide-ranging, having used almost every mobile and desktop OS for at least some time. His area of expertise is in anything Apple or Google. He also considers a biography page as an excellent way to make people laugh, but can't currently think of a suitable joke.

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Everyone enjoys taking pictures, as taking a photo is how many choose to capture a moment or memory in digital form. The iPhone — and, by extension, iOS as a platform — has quickly become one of the most popular ways to take these photos. Apple has included industry-leading optics in their devices since the iPhone 4. More importantly, Apple has focused on the software side of their solution, making a solution where tech specs take a back seat to the processing techniques in iOS. Let’s take a look back at the year through the lens (pun intended) of photography. (more…)

Podcasting has been around since the early 2000s, and it has undergone a massive amount of change since then. The mobile industry itself has seen change — gone are the iPods and Creative MP3 players, replaced by the dominance of smartphones. While the iPhone doesn’t hold the lion’s amount of market share that the iPod did, it has been enough to catapult both podcast clients and podcasts themselves to a completely new level. In 2013, we saw just how utterly successful that market has become. (more…)

Apple ships a very capable weather app in iOS 7. That weather app uses Yahoo’s information, and takes cues from other apps in the design and feature department. On iOS, many developers take a hint as to what they need to include in a weather app from Apple’s efforts.

Weather Line goes in a different direction: what two conditions do you need to know most often? Temperature, and whether or not it’s going to rain in the next hour or so — or at least that’s what the developers bet on. Other information is available in the app, but those two key pieces of data are displayed most prominently. Interested? (more…)

Twitter clients were once one of the most popular apps on the App Store. In the time of Tweetie, there were more options than most anyone could keep up with. At that time, one of the more popular options was an app named Osfoora — strange name, particularly for a category where most apps included a play on the word Twitter.

Osfoora hung around for some time, but ultimately fell behind as apps like Tweetbot, Twitterrific, and Tweetie 2 become more popular. Then, Twitter bought Tweetie, and roughly two years later started throwing up API limitations for developers of third-party apps. It is in this ecosystem that Osfoora 2 has been released; can it compete? (more…)

Measuring your body’s mass, or weighing, will likely be something you do more and more, especially after the holidays and the feast of food that usually brings. You may also be looking for a way to get into shape as a New Year’s Resolution. Regardless, you’re going to be interested in your weight.

Some of the high-end iPhone weight trackers connect to Bluetooth scales or other peripherals to automatically update your weight every time you take the time to step onto the scale. Weightless isn’t that — it’s a low-tech solution to a problem many have. Additionally, it’s cheap, and is compatible with any scale you may have around the house. Is it useful everyday? Does it actually help to manage your weight? (more…)

My hunt for the perfect sports app continues unabated. In my mind, a sports app has to strike a perfect balance between information density, speed, and intuitiveness. None that I have tested have quite hit that mark.

The latest in the lineup of apps to receive my attention is CBS Sports. Recently redesigned for iOS 7, the app sports a slick new interface, as well as support for all of iOS 7’s gestures. Additionally, it offers support for a wide range of leagues and sports. Is it able to finally strike that balance between statistics and design? (more…)

News aggregators and discovery tools are among the most popular apps in the App Store. The most popular, such as Flipboard, attract a major following and are staples to the smartphone experience. Others tend to be more niche: some offer specific sources, or integration with other services. Interesting promises to be more of the latter, but with a playful design and emphasis on subjects that the technically savvy are most likely to enjoy.

Interesting launches in to a saturated market. The news aggregator has been tried in almost every possible form: from digital magazine to traditional list, there’s not much differentiation to be found in the presentation of content. (more…)

Camera apps are among the most popular on the App Store. From social networks based upon photos to simple apps that make collages, all types of activities that are based on photos are active pieces of the market.

Most of these apps rely upon Apple’s own Camera app for the photo itself. This isn’t surprising — the native Camera app is utterly fantastic in almost any condition, as Apple has taken its time to optimize in every possible way. Camera Plus — note the word “Plus,” not the symbol — takes on Apple’s solution, as well as all other competitors. (more…)

Creating an alternative to a stock app is risky. Most iPhone owners will never go looking for an app that will replace something that Apple already ships, unless they are looking for additional functionality or something radically different.

Creating an alternative to a stock app that is well entrenched within both Apple’s ecosystem and within the hearts and minds of consumers is borderline insane. While people are used to changing their web browsers, most don’t care to actively search for a replacement to a music app. The bar is set high for Ecoute 2.0: can it survive in a world where Apple ships its stock music app on every iPhone? (more…)

Ember can be many things to many people. The app can function as a private digital scrapbook, collecting images and screenshots on your device and presenting them to you in a custom list. It can be used to organize images for graphic designers — or for reviewers, who take screenshots of apps.

At its most basic level, Ember is a way to collect and store images of any type away from the stock photos app. It makes browsing those photos easy, and it makes sharing those photos seamless. With its Mac client, it also becomes an effective way to manage a library of specific photos and screenshots. But, with competitors like Evernote available, is Ember worth it? (more…)

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