PG
Author

Jordan Merrick

I write for a number of Apple-related sites, including Sparsebundle and am the author of Backing Up Your Mac With Time Machine, a Made for iBooks book that explains everything about backing up your Mac. You can find me on both App.net and Twitter.

Visit Site

When Apple announced turn-by-turn direction support in the all-new Apple Maps at the launch of iOS 6, many wondered where this would leave existing satellite navigation apps that had, at the time, been riding high in the top grossing charts of the App Store. In addition to Apple’s own service, Waze sprung out of nowhere with its more social way of providing directional navigation, live traffic and speed trap information to iOS users in a completely free package. More recently, Google released their all-new Google Maps for iOS that also includes full turn-by-turn directions that’s powered by the software company’s extensive mapping service.

With Apple, Google and Waze offering free functionality to what you would have previously payed upwards of $50 for similar functionality, some companies have had to radically change their approach towards pricing. One such company is CoPilot, which has moved its CoPilot GPS app towards a freemium-based pricing policy by providing the foundations of a complete navigation app that you can tailor to suit.

(more…)

Gneo is an interesting task management app that tries to do things very differently. On first glance, the app appears to be a cross between Trello and any other GTD app, but what sets it apart is its advanced feature set and rather unique take on overseeing your entire task list.

The app isn’t without fault and, in some instances, the app can be frustrating but it sets itself apart with a fresh perspective on task and project management that stops this from being just another todo app.

(more…)

Apple’s Numbers app, part of the iWork suite of apps for iOS, has often been one of the most popular apps for crunching those numbers on the go, despite some rather painful limitations. It was certainly not a perfect app, far from it, but it worked well enough and looked good enough to still be useable, especially in the absence of any form of Microsoft Office for iOS.

With the relaunch of iWork on both Mac and iOS, Numbers received a huge makeover to include some of the new, and welcome, features that have made them so popular. But, despite the new makeover, some of the app just doesn’t add up.

(more…)

Among the (many) announcements at Apple’s October 2013 event was the updating of iWork for iOS, now free for any existing users and those who purchase a new iOS device. One of the last bastilles of leather and wood effects, iWork was completely revamped and brought in line with iOS 7.

For PowerPoint refugees and anyone wanting to easily create slick presentations that are gorgeous to watch, as well as build, Keynote is a great example of how Apple can really push the boundaries of what is possible with iOS.

(more…)

If there’s one genre of app that takes advantage of almost every sensor that the iPhone contains, it’s fitness apps. By monitoring and tracking our progress, they can be a key motivational tool to power through and keep up the exercise regime, and I see more people than ever with an iPhone strapped to their arm.

Nike has long been at the forefront of blurring the lines between fitness and technology, having started with their Nike+iPod sensor over seven years ago and continues to do so with Nike+ Running. It’s been some time since we initially published our Nike+ GPS review (over two and a half years ago, to be precise) and, since then, both the app and the Nike+ running service have undergone some fundamental changes.
(more…)

Apple’s Podcasts app for iOS has had a somewhat rocky history, first launching in 2012 with an app that was widely criticised for its unreliable functionality and hideous skeuomorphic-heavy interface. A second update, likely started whilst Scott Forstall was still at Apple, was released earlier this year that attempted to resolve many of the original issues and tone down the skeuomorphism, but it was still was far from perfect.

Amongst the huge number of app updates from Apple after their October 2013 event, Podcasts was updated with an all-new iOS 7 look and feel that removes every last trace of tape decks and push-buttons that made Podcasts the eye-sore it was. With some further functionality and refinements, is Podcasts finally an app Apple can be proud of?

(more…)

Almost all carriers in the United States offer support for Visual Voicemail, a service introduced with the original iPhone that provides a more flexible way to manage your voicemail messages. No more dialling in to listen to a stream of messages in chronological order, instead the messages are downloaded to your iPhone automatically.

For the rest of the world, however, it’s a different story. Most carriers across mainland Europe don’t support the service, with only two carriers here in the UK (O2 and EE) officially supporting Visual Voicemail, but even then it’s not available on all price plans. In fact, more US carriers support Visual Voicemail than the rest of the world combined! HulloMail not only restores much of the functionality of Visual Voicemail to those without carrier support but it offers features that take it to a whole new level.

(more…)

Conversion apps are ten a penny on the App Store and are one of the most popular types of app available today. Each app that can convert feet to inches will do so in the exact same way, so developers have to come up with other ways of trying to make their app stand out above the rest.

The developers behind Camera+, tap tap tap, have released a significant update to their Convert app which, whilst containing more units of measurement than I ever realised existed, it does so in an easy to navigate way while offering some additional functionality that goes beyond simple conversions and really enhances the app.
(more…)

While some radio and television networks have firmly cemented themselves in the past, opposing digital distribution of media, the BBC has been quite the opposite, embracing digital distribution with their award-winning iPlayer service. More recently, the BBC has been quietly revolutionising radio in the same way they did with television by making almost every radio show broadcast available through iPlayer, with a select number even distributed as podcasts.

To make BBC radio as accessible as possible, the company have released the BBC iPlayer Radio app, which has recently been updated with podcast support. It’s an app we’ve not looked at so far, but with the golden age of podcasting upon us, it’s high-time we check out the latest app from the Beeb.

(more…)

If you’ve ever taken a trip on the London Underground (or any subway service for that matter) then you’ll no doubt notice that each train is littered with small ads, providing both an effective means of marketing whilst giving us commuters something to read when we’ve accidentally left our headphones at home.

Sandwiched between the various online dating sites (apparently everyone in London is lonely) and cosmetic surgery boutiques was an ad for a new online music service called Bloom.fm. The ad, promising features such as 22 million tracks, offline playback and a radio service similar to that of Spotify and Rdio, was enough to pique my interest. After spending a few days with the iPhone app and service, I can honestly say it is making me think twice about continuing my Spotify Premium subscription.

(more…)

Page 1 of 212
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow