I’ve never been the biggest fan of traditional word games, whether it was a game of Scrabble or a word search; the former involved too much luck and the latter made me dizzy. Still, I found myself looking through the App Store for a word-based game that I could play, something to challenge myself and hold my interest for long periods of time. With Puzzlejuice, I have found that game.

Of course, calling Puzzlejuice a word game is selling the title short. Indeed, it’s a combination of word game, Tetris and color matching. It is, in a word, unique. (more…)

How can I introduce League of Evil 2? As a sequel to one of my favorite iOS games? As a difficult, well-designed platformer? How about as a testament to the responsiveness of the iPhone’s touch screen? League of Evil 2 is all of those things and more. I had the chance to review the original game a while back, so I think that it’s only appropriate for me to take a look at this, the hot-off-the-press sequel.

The only thing I need to ask is this: are you ready for some hardcore, evil scientist butt-kickin’? I mean, not physically, obviously. What did evil scientists ever do to you? (more…)

Many iPhone apps take their design cues from the status quo; Apple began the iPhone’s life with a light blue, left-to-right application style and many apps still follow a similar pattern. Even if they’re crafted of the finest skeuomorphic Corinthian leather, they’re still just another take on the same old design paradigm.

Then there are the apps that do something special. The applications that throw their hands up and say, “I’m going to be different!” Here are a few of them, and what app designers can learn from each one. (more…)

Crowded space. A comment on other task management systems. Something about Getting Things Done, or Pomodoro or Zen or discipline. You know how these sorts of reviews generally go: we want to get more things done, you want to get more things done, and developers want to make some money. While I enjoy reviewing productivity apps, a part of me has grown a bit bored with keeping a task list.

Luckily, that’s not all Wunderkit does. The new product from 6Wunderkinder, the evil masterminds that have released and updated the task-keeping Wunderlist for some time now, Wunderkit is collaborative working redefined. (more…)

If you follow anything Apple, you’ve heard about the controversy surrounding the working conditions at Foxconn, the supplier of such products as the iPhone and the iPad. This controversy has been swirling around the news outlets for a while now and things have really heated up over the past few weeks.

I’m here to ask one important question: how much do people really care? Forget about what the press wants you to think and ask yourself that question. Deep down, how much does it really matter? (more…)

Years ago, the iPod won the digital media player wars. It wasn’t really a fair fight; the iPod had Apple and the record companies behind it, pushing for people to purchase music and providing a smooth, streamlined way to do so. The iPod’s dominance continued for years, and when Steve Jobs announced the first iPhone, he also said that it was the finest iPod that the company had ever made.

Now the iPhone is a product category unto itself, and it’s left the iPod’s legacy in the dust. While you can still listen to music with your iPhone, you can now do something that no iPod ever could: create music. While there are many apps out there that make this possible, my favorite is GarageBand, sold directly through Apple. (more…)

Any time I see a free app, I automatically look for the Top In-App Purchases bar to appear across the top of the app’s page. I’ve been trained to do this by the so-called freemium model that has taken the App Store by storm.

My feelings on this model are mixed. Is it a lie that is used to convince people that an application can be enjoyed for free, only to find out that you have to pay for the most features, or is it an innocent business model that capitalizes on a feature of the App Store? (more…)

For the longest time, I didn’t feel the need to play around with alternative iOS browsers. Why would I, when Mobile Safari fulfilled just about every need that I had? I was content with Apple’s default offering, and would skim through browser reviews just to say I had checked out the competition.

This changed with a review that I read on our sister site, Mac.AppStorm. Joshua Johnson reviewed Sleipnir, a browser that combined WebKit rendering with a powerful, gesture-based navigation system. I immediately downloaded the app on the iPhone and began to play with it. Here are my thoughts.

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It would make USB syncing a thing of the past. It would remove practically all of the wires from our lives, hold all of our personal information in a secure data center, and make it readily available to all of our devices. It wasn’t MobileMe. The “it” is iCloud, and Apple made a lot of promises about what our lives would be like once it was released.

So, where’s all of my stuff? Where’s the fast, “magical” syncing? Better yet, why aren’t more applications taking advantage of what Apple’s built?

(more…)

So many of us are on the constant lookout for things to read without a good way to find them. Sure, there are things like Flipboard and Twitter, but sometimes we want a more carefully-curated reading list without the responsibility of apps like Instapaper.

This is where Zite comes in. After debuting on the iPad, Zite made the jump over to the iPhone, much like competitor Flipboard. Is Zite worth sticking on your phone, or should you look elsewhere for your lusted-after content? Read on and find out.
(more…)

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