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When iOS 7 was first introduced, the buzzword heard most often around the water cooler was “Flat design.” Apparently, someone decided that iOS 7 had certain design aesthetics that made it look more flat than iOS 6, and therefore, that was the way people should start designing their apps.

Thing is, iOS 7 isn’t flat, per se. In fact, it’s quite layered and nuanced, and those that talk about it being flat are just being lazy writers and repopping what other tech luminaries said from the start. How so? Well let’s get into it. (more…)

When it comes to Apple’s iconic media events, the one thing that guarantees hype is new hardware. No matter what else is on the agenda, iPhones and iPads are the star attractions. Understandably, much of the other news interspersed between device unveilings is swept aside, perhaps given a whisper of coverage after the dust settles. For me, it is those tidbits I find tantalisingly mysterious, a mere breadcrumb hinting at a grander plan. Last week’s iPhone event was no different.

Prior to WWDC I’d have forgiven anyone for thinking iWork had been put out to pasture. With no desktop update since 2009, it’s fair to say the web app versions of Pages, Keynote, and Numbers came with more than a little intrigue. In a sense, Apple had just created its first multi-platform apps. Now, four months later, Apple has dropped another breadcrumb. All three iWork iOS apps are now free for purchasers of a new iOS 7 device — Apple’s strategy is beginning to come full circle with more than a little risk and reward.

Continue reading over at iPad.AppStorm

I have a buddy of mine who is an iOS developer,  so he gets me all of the inside scoops that I ever need about what’s going on. A few months back at WWDC, he sends me an iPhone picture of a controller attached to an iPhone with the caption, “Holy crap! They’re doing third-party controllers for games now!” I was ecstatic.

And then I promptly forgot about it until the other day when all this talk about Nintendo made its rounds on the web, which got the wheels turning again. Is there a way that Nintendo could get onto the iOS platform and still keep control of its hardware? Maybe. (more…)

With the introduction of the new iPhones came more big news with the iPhone 5s, the inclusion of the M7 coprocessor. As Apple puts it, the M7 is essentially the Robin to the A7’s Batman, but focuses purely on the accelerometer, gyroscope and compass. It also means that the M7 could put FitBit out of business.

Or does it? Because it wasn’t that long ago that I wrote about my own experiences with mobile fitness devices. Although the M7 coprocessor does seem like it could be the stepping stone to replacing a FitBit, it’s not quite there. Not yet, anyway. (more…)

We had all heard the rumors prior to the big announcement, but yesterday it was all out there in the open for the world to see. There were now two iPhones: the iPhone 5C and iPhone 5S. But what struck me about the two models wasn’t that there was now a low-cost version of the phone that changed the game, but that one of them was significantly better than the other.

Just a few years ago, we had a low-end Mac that fit into the lineup. It was made with a plastic case that was, for the most part, seamless. And it was flanked by more powerful models with higher options. Is the iPhone 5S now really the iPhone Pro? (more…)

I was at the barbershop the other day, getting my hair cut as I do every few weeks, when my barber says to the room, “Isn’t the new iPhone supposed to be coming out soon?” I’m about to open my mouth when a guy sitting in a chair to my left peeks up from his phone to say, “Beginning of October. Who cares anyways, Apple doesn’t have anything for me anymore.” Then he went back to playing with his HTC One.

Surly and inaccurate statements aside, I’ve heard similar thoughts voiced amongst the Apple community. The feeling seems to be that Apple’s already pulled out all of its magic tricks, what could they show us tomorrow that would really wow the crowd? What’s the big feature this year? Do they have one more thing in them or have we seen all the magic left to offer?

Who knows. But more importantly, why do you care? (more…)

There was one person ahead of me at Starbucks. I caught a look from the barista. Was she staring at me or my trembling hand? I stared quickly back down at my iPhone and saw the balance on my Starbucks card in Passbook: $0.11.

Something wasn’t right. I had just topped it up on my way out the door! I had foolishly left my wallet at home, trusting Apple would take care of me on the open road. And here I was, seconds left before I would have to turn away from the till in resignation.

Then I did something stupid. I don’t know if I had mad trust in my supernatural ability to just fix the issue, or if I thought it would be resolved if I just offered to wash my dishes. The barista asked what I wanted, and I ordered anyway. (more…)

Everyone typically becomes bored of something at one time or another. It’s the inevitable loss of interest that causes people to give up that great hobby they’ve been doing for so long, or to stop eating oatmeal for breakfast every morning simply because it’s become stale. Change is good, yes, but eventually the redundant pattern of quitting something and starting another task can start to show — very much so.

One of the most prominent topics of interest is mobile gaming. The industry has been around since the 1970s, but lately it’s evolved to something beyond the classic Donkey Kong Country on a Game Boy and the first iteration of Tetris on a mobile phone. Tense games of Snake were classic back in the day when Nokia ruled the mobile phone market. Now, however, Apple and Google govern the domain. The App Store and Google Play Store have brought many fabulous first-person shooters, adventures of evil swine and vexed avian, and role-playing ventures like Bastion. With all this innovation, something was left behind — what was it? (more…)

There was once a small social network called Path. It existed only on mobile devices, save for the pictures that some people post publicly on Twitter — in my opinion, that kind of defeats the purpose of Path as a social network, but I’m not going to talk about that. Path was getting a lot of critical acclaim up until the point where it was discovered they secretly uploaded your iPhone’s address book to their servers. That whole ordeal was widespread on every major publication and really hurt their credibility.

Back in February, Kevin Whipps discussed how trust had been compromised due to this mistake that Path made. He explained that there’s really no way to fix it since everything already went too far and it looked as if they were really invading your privacy. In any case, I still use the service and rather like it, but it still has a good ways to go before it’s near success. Let’s find out why after the break.  (more…)

Last week, the Internet was all in a tizzy about the latest video out of Google, a concept titled Project Glass. It’s this headset that puts a single screen in front of your right eye and displays information about the environment you’re in. If you haven’t seen it yet, take a moment and check out the video, it’s worth the time.

Some are saying that this idea is genius, while others are chastising it as a dumb move and a piece of vaporware. But it does open up a conversation, particularly in regards to the iPhone: What is the future of the device?  (more…)

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