Posts Tagged

app.net

I’ve made it no secret that I’m in love with App.net, but my review of Whisper made it pretty clear that I also love the apps being built on the service. Whisper is a phenomenal app worth every penny and in-app purchase.

You can find Jared Sinclair and Jamin Guy, the developers of both Riposte and Whisper, on App.net. I was so excited about Whisper that I just had to talk with them about the creative process behind it and what’s coming up in Whisper’s future. As you can see, they were happy to oblige. (more…)

Timelines are core components of many social networking experiences. Facebook rolled out its timeline feature nearly two years ago, displaying major life events and activities in a beautiful chronological layout. Unfortunately, social network timelines are often more about the reader than the creator. Users are forced to broadcast their checkins and life events, because most networks aren’t designed to handle private posts well.

Ohai, created by Mustacheware, is a checkin journaling app, built upon the App.net infrastructure. The app can post user checkins to Twitter and/or App.net, or tuck them away into a private journal. Can an app built on a social network yield a satisfying private journaling experience? Read on to find out. (more…)

I’m very selective about the way that I privately communicate with friends, family and colleagues. I really like iMessage and I often feel like it’s the best solution for most of my needs, especially since it’s built right into iOS. I don’t like Facebook much, but use Facebook Messenger because of its popularity.

I love Twitter, but I’m not a fan of its implementation of messages or the standalone apps that have tried to take advantage of them. And although a lot of friends of mine use Google Hangouts, I find the app is remarkably inconsistent and try not to rely on it. That’s why I was surprised when I tried Whisper, a fantastic private messaging app for App.net. It’s the first third-party app of its kind to make its way into my daily life. Read on to find out why I’m so excited about it. (more…)

Information overload is a major headache. With a huge surge in the amount of user generated and professionally created content, it’s getting tougher to find the right type of content that aligns with our interests. Social networks such as Facebook and Twitter try to bring some sanity by providing content from the people you know (or want to know).

Relying on a circle of friends and peers isn’t going to solve the problem of content discovery altogether, though. There got to be a better way to curtail the inflow of news from sources that are irrelevant, but at the same time helping us identify new and hidden gems in the rough. App.news tries valiantly to solve the content discovery problem over at the Twitter competitor App.net. (more…)

App.net developers have produced a wide variety of applications, ranging from simple ports of Twitter apps to innovative apps that support App.net’s file storage API. Apps that support the service’s basic user timeline are plentiful, but the spotlight has shifted to the apps that ditch conventional design and support App.net’s new and innovative features. Chimp is one of the newest App.net clients that does just this, and today we’ll put it under the microscope to see just how well it stands up to the competition.

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I was actually really late to the photo filter game on my iPhone. It wasn’t until earlier this year that I really got into Instagram, and Analog Camera really rejuvenated my love for a truly mobile camera app. (Actually, I’d say it spoiled me). The iOS 7 camera has me excited, but I’m not sure it can replace both those apps on my home screen.

That being said, I’m always up for trying new camera apps, because I think they’re a lot of fun. Recently, Sprinter caught my eye: It’s an Instagram-like camera app that uses App.net as its social network, so the community is already there. Sprinter’s goal is to make sharing photos to ADN as easy as possible. Read on to find out what I think about this new app. (more…)

I’ve written my fair share of articles about App.net and the clients I test out, but there’s always new ones out there that I want to try. I have yet to find the ADN client that fits every one of my needs.

I’m aware, of course, that most people are using Netbot these days; It’s free and admittedly awesome. But it’s wearing Tweetbot‘s clothes, and I want my ADN experience to feel visually unique from Twitter without losing the power of Tapbot’s app. In the past, I’ve tried Rivr (for iPhone), which was full of features and pleasant to look at, but after several weeks of use, it didn’t capture my attention anymore and I was back to Netbot (which also has an iPad app).

Zephyr is the closest I’ve come to the Netbot experience. In colloquial terms, I’m really stoked about this app. Read on to find out why. (more…)

App.net (or ADN) features an unusual business model, particularly for a social network. The idea of a paid social network that depends on its developers to advance the platform is unheard of, but comes with some significant benefits. For one thing, you know your information is private. App.net isn’t going to sell anything you post. For some people, this is enough to differentiate the “Twitter clone” from Twitter. But perhaps more interestingly (and not unlike the Twitter of old), it encourages developers to race towards innovation.

Rivr is trying to claim a piece of that innovation for itself. Rivr is an app that focuses on making your stream beautiful and intuitive, and it’s not afraid to bend some interface rules to get it done. Rivr is extremely functional, but you might be wondering if its ease of use gets lost in all this extra functionality, or if it’s as easy to use as Netbot, perhaps the most popular ADN client in town. Read on to find out. (more…)

Most of the buzz around App.net has been gone and it is not a headline anymore. However, we can’t deny its growth with the invitation-based freemium accounts and the file storage API, allowing users to store files in their own server.

Still, App.net is mostly known as a social network with an ever-growing development of new clients to host the conversations. There are so many clients being released that we could write almost once a day about them, yet after having tried Felix, I doubt you’ll ever look back. (more…)

App.net is the social network that made significant news earlier in the year. Launching with a price to users of $50/year, critics of App.net highlighted how price would like driver user adoption down, especially with many comparisons being drawn with Twitter.

Tapbots, in the world of iPhone apps, is probably best known for Tweebot, an immensly popular iPhone client for Twitter. Netbot is the Tapbot-developed counterpart to Tweebot, and quite possibly the best third-party client for App.net. Let’s take a look. (more…)

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