Posts Tagged

Internet

The field of podcast apps is quickly becoming crowded: Apple’s own app, Pocket Casts, Instacast, Downcast, and soon to be Marco Arment’s Downcast. Can there be room for yet another client in a category that is difficult to differentiate in?

The answer to that question comes in Castro, and it is overwhelmingly “yes.” Castro will, for many, be the de facto podcast client from this point forward. (more…)

Dropbox, an online file-storage and transfer utility, forms the backbone of many of iOS’ most useful apps and utilities. Dropbox, which at its most fundamental level is just a way to store files in the internet, allows developers and users to take advantage of a file system that is always up-to-date and available as long as a connection to the internet is present.

But while these third-party apps can plug in to the Dropbox API and unlock these features, the first place most users go to use Dropbox is the official client. Boxie is an attempt to usurp the traditional Dropbox app by covering the basics, all while adding new, power-user features and a design that is supposed to make browsing the app and editing its contents even faster. (more…)

After my PayPal account got hacked a year ago, I didn’t take any more chances. I changed all of the passwords of my most important accounts, making sure they are impossible to remember and predict. The problem now is finding a safe place for all of my usernames, passwords, account numbers and more, and being able to access the list whenever I need to log in.

It didn’t take long for me to purchase a copy of 1Password for both the Mac and iOS. Recently though, I reviewed the desktop version of oneSafe and believe it to be a terrific alternative to the rather pricey 1Password app. What I didn’t mention was how significantly different it was to its iOS version after being able to test both apps together.

Priced at $5.99 on iTunes, oneSafe is a universal app that boasts of unique security features that keep all of your accounts and web logins safe from intruders. Let’s see what oneSafe for iOS can really do and if it also stands as a worthy alternative to 1Password 4. (more…)

Just recently, I wrote a review of Leef App for iPhone. The idea is built around accessing Forrst and browsing the latest questions, shots, code snippets, and popular links. Up until recently, there hasn’t been much competition for Forrst on iOS.

Except the new release of Bosquet really turns things around. This is a much more simple application compared to others that access Forrst or Dribbble. It provides all the default features you would expect with a third-party API connection. Plus, the app is fun to use and only comes with a $0.99 price tag! Let’s get into it after the jump. (more…)

Social news is still a new idea in the realm of social media. Digg itself only launched into popularity back in 2005. Currently it has lost a lot of attention over to the social news community Reddit, but there are still many loyal diggers cascading down the front page. Along with the attentive v4 redesign we’ve also seen a new iOS app launch.

This release still includes most of the functionality you would expect from Digg. It’s easy to log in and start voting on stories, both popular and trending. Unfortunately, we have also lost a lot of content such as mobile user profiles. So is it worth the download?

(more…)

Google Reader is by far one of my favorite services. In case you haven’t used it, Google Reader allows you to read all your RSS feeds on the same place, share them and add notes to them easily. It’s been available for quite some time now, and it’s just great because it’s simple and reliable. Since I got my iPhone, I’ve been reading my feeds using Google Reader straight from Safari since they have a mobile version (which is pretty good I might add). Lately though, since Flipboard for iPhone was launched, I’ve been reading all my Google Reader news from that app.

But to change things up a bit, I decided to take a look at GoReader. It’s an app that works specifically with Google’s service and syncs everything as well. Let’s see if it’s a viable replacement for its competitors.

(more…)

I prefer applications that provide some sort of syncing service. This is pretty advantageous compared to other apps, since you don’t need to worry about backing anything up in case you restore your iPhone (or if you lose it), and you can use the same information from different devices and even different services. For example, you can use Wunderlist from nearly any device or computer, even a browser, which is a lot more comfortable than just having your tasks on your iPhone.

Considering the advantage of having an app that syncs with any service, here’s a list of approximately 40 apps that have this functionality.

(more…)

Safari on the iPhone is an extremely well designed browser. It’s simple, useful and very powerful. There are a number of alternatives on the App Store that offer extra functionality, but personally, none of them live up to the expectations, and I always tend to switch back to Safari after a while or even without thinking about it.

Dolphin Browser was originally available only for Android smartphones, and is pretty popular on that platform. It was recently ported to the iOS line, and in this review I’m going to see if its popularity on Android is well justified. Follow on after the break.

(more…)

Last week, the Internet was abuzz with talk about a single tweet which caused quite a stir. The head of a PR firm tweeted: “#AlwaysBetOnDuke too many went too far with their reviews…we r reviewing who gets games next time and who doesn’t based on today’s venom.” Working hand in hand with PR firms is something we at AppStorm have to do pretty much every day, but it’s not often we’ve seen one of them speak out like this.

Because of that issue, it got me thinking about how we do our reviews here at AppStorm, and it made me wonder if some of our readers think we might have a bias towards the positive side of things, and therefore, we don’t give “real” reviews. So to address that issue, I figured I’d peel back the curtain a bit and talk about how we at AppStorm review an app, and what that means for you, the reader.

(more…)

Ever since the iPhone App Store first appeared, users have cried out for third-party web browsers. While Apple doesn’t allow anything that can independently interpret Javascript (read: full-fledged web browsers) in the App Store, they eventually began approving apps that use WebKit (the core of Safari and MobileSafari) to display webpages.

In other words, you won’t be seeing Firefox for iPad anytime soon, but browsers that—to appropriate the ever-relevant car metaphor—use the same engine as MobileSafari with a different chassis and paint job—are now available for iPhone, iPod touch, and iPad.

Apple insists that browsing the web on an iPad is already pretty magical, but there’s always someone ready to step up and demonstrate stronger magic. Atomic Web Browser is one such contestant.

(more…)

Page 1 of 212
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow
theatre-aglow